THE FLAVOR OF SPAIN™ Part 1: Influences of Flamenco, Sephardic, Moorish and Italian Cultures

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THE FLAVOR OF SPAIN™

Part 1:  Influences of Flamenco, Sephardic, Moorish and Italian Cultures

fos1

Elena Greco

mezzo-soprano

Richard Gordon

piano

with
Daniel Garcia, guitar
and
Guillermo Cardenas, percussion

June 27, 2012, 7:30-9:30 pm, $15
at Studios 353, 353 W 48th St (bet 8th/9th Aves)

What is it about Spanish music that lets you know instantly that what you’re hearing is Spanish? The Flavor of Spain explores in multi-media the exotic cultural influences that create that unique sound. Deep in the lush, passionate and thrilling sound of this music are influences of the Moorish, Greek, Turkish, Italian, French, Sephardic and Flamenco cultures, and you will hear all of these elements in the music of The Flavor of Spain.

In Part 1 of this concert series, we focus on southern Spain. We will offer some Flamenco and Sephardic songs which exemplify the important contribution of these cultures to Spanish music, along with settings of folk songs from these regions by Andalusian composers De Falla, Taboada and Lorca. In addition, you will hear beautiful Spanish art songs from the 19th and 20th centuries, including the North American premiere of a song by Federico Longas, and songs of Turina and Obradors. A presentation of images, music and historical points of interest will introduce the live music, guiding you deeper into the “flavor” of Spanish music. You will leave with an understanding of how this unique sound came into being, as well as a deep appreciation for this amazing genre and the beauty of the Spanish language in song.

To see the full concert program, click here: The Flavor of Spain Part 1.

For more information about The Flavor of Spain concert series and the performers, click here: The Flavor of Spain.

Please note: This is a FRAGRANCE-FREE event so that those who have allergies and asthma can be comfortable.

 

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